How to Handle Surface Rust on Your Mopar
How to Handle Surface Rust on Your Mopar
We show you how to handle surface rust on your Mopar without taking it to a shop.

Mopar projects come in all kinds of conditions, and though we’d all like to start with a garage-kept survivor, reality means that most of us are not so lucky. Projects are often cars that have sat in fields, sometimes for decades, or vehicles that have passed from owner to owner in various incomplete stages of “restoration.” Even if the car in question is generally solid, one of the most typical issues to deal with is surface rust. Surface rust of the sheetmetal can begin under a weathered vinyl top, bare metal left exposed from a stillborn project, or just the factory paint giving up after more than 40 years in the elements. Surface rust will usually come with light to moderate pitting of the sheetmetal surface, and this condition can be treated; however, if the rust has advanced to the stages of extreme pitting and pinholes, all bets are off. Replacement becomes the only viable plan.

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Photo Gallery: How to Handle Surface Rust on Your Mopar

How to Properly Install Front Windshield and Back Glass

A pro shows you how to properly install a front windshield and back glass.Window glass is by design supposed to be practically invisible. It’s there to protect us from debris, wind, and any other element of weather, but unless it’s raining, we should b

Hot Parts – November 2014

Take a look at this month’s Hot Parts from Eastwood, Dakota Digital, The Roadster Shop and Eagle Specialty Products Inc!The Roadster Shop: Charger Suspension a Photo Gallery: Hot Parts – November

Mopar Suspension Guide

Despite what the heretics from other brands may say, vintage Mopar suspension works quite well when properly set up and tuned. That said, for reasons we’ll get into, your suspension probably doesn’t.Despite what the heretics from other brands may say,

Randy Malik’s 452ci Low-Deck Wedge Mopar Engine
Randy Malik's 452ci Low-Deck Wedge Mopar Engine
This 452ci low-deck wedge made 667 hp with simple off-the-shelf parts at the AMSOIL Engine Masters Challenge.

Though Mopar’s big-block has been out of production since 1978, their popularity never seems to fade. Unlike most other manufacturers that saved the “good stuff” for their high-end performance packages, Chrysler tended to use the same hardware across the board. Whether it was going in a high-performance package car, or just a run-of-the-mill sedan or truck, the hard parts were all the same. Chrysler’s 400 big-block was a latecomer to the party, introduced in 1972 as a replacement for the low-deck 383. With an identical 3.375-inch stroke borrowed from its predecessor, the 400 came through with the biggest bore ever from a factory big-block, at 4.342-inch—that’s .022-inch larger than the mighty 440. Even with its promising big-bore, short-stroke configuration, the 400 never earned legendary status during its production life, a victim of the repressive smog equipment of the time. For the most part it was just a basic middle to large displacement production engine, powering a wide range of Chrysler products.

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Photo Gallery: Randy Malik’s 452ci Low-Deck Wedge Mopar Engine

Restoring A 1969 Dodge Charger Dash

Removing mold, grime, lizard eggs, and eventually restoring a dash.Other than possibly under the hood, what is the one area of a car that you spend the most time in? If you don’t think that it is the interior, you need to drive your car more often. Eve

Getting Juiced – The Benefits of Adding Water/Methanol Injection

Whether your preference is vintage muscle or the new offerings, increasing the power output of your ride is something that has built multi-million dollar businesses.Increasing the power of an engine is a goal of any gearhead. Deny that fact, and we’ll

Performance Clinic – Questions and Answers – October 2014
Performance Clinic - Questions and Answers - October 2014
We help to answer more of our readers’ tech questions!

Long Tale of Woe

A few years back I decided to rebuild the 440 in my GTX. I was getting some blow-by, and wanted a little more horsepower than that from the factory. I sent it to my local machine shop and had it rebuilt. I purchased a new COMP cam with lifters and springs to match. Break-in oil and lube was installed, and the cam was broken in to COMP’s specs. It sounded great and ran great—for as long as it held together. a
Photo Gallery: Performance Clinic – Questions and Answers – October 2014

Hot Parts – October 2014

A look at the latest parts from Mickey Thompson, Race Ramps, Strange Engineering and more!Huffin’ Hemi If you’ve transplanted a late-model Hemi into your classic ride, then you need to check out The Supercharger Store’s new huffer kit for this engine.

Three Simple Steps to Big Flow Gains
Three Simple Steps to Big Flow Gains
There’s a saying that when it comes to engine building, “the power is in the ports.” Airflow is the key to turning up the power output of any engine, and with choices in performance cylinder heads, there is plenty of flow to be had.

There’s a saying that when it comes to engine building, “the power is in the ports.” Airflow is the key to turning up the power output of any engine, and with choices in performance cylinder heads, there is plenty of flow to be had. However, when money is tight, budget constraints often dictate cylinder head selection. We see plenty of Mopar street machines running around with OE cylinder heads. Sure, a swap to aftermarket heads might be in the cards for later when the funds are available, but is that a reason to give up substantial horsepower right now? Port work can improve the situation substantially, but grinding on that old iron has its practical limits. Professional porting cost bucks, and unless the engine is being built for a class that demands stock iron, it’s generally impractical. That said, is it worth pulling out the tools and giving the heads a little rework? If you can handle a grinder, the answer is almost always “yes.”

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Photo Gallery: Three Simple Steps to Big Flow Gains

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