How You Can Build a Stout 537HP Street 440

For the budget-minded Mopar fan, the 440 offers an abundance of cheap power with a few basic upgrades to step up the areas where the factory 440 is a little short.Chrysler’s big-block wedge has always been a staple of Mopar street performance for good

No More Crank Windows!

We show you on a 1969 Dodge Super Bee how to change your regulators to repair broken power windows and door locks.When was the last time you attempted to reach all the way across your interior to try to roll down the passenger window? You know what we

Hot Parts – December 2014
Hot Parts - December 2014
Hot Parts takes a look at: a STR8 exhaust, Challenger headlight bezzels, a shark grille reissue, and Fury dashpads.

Late-Model Hemi:
SRT8 Exhaust
SRT8 Mopars are powerful and sound pretty darn good as they roll off the showroom floor, but that doesn’t mean they can’t get a touch meaner and see a bump in power from some aftermarket know-how. This new full exhaust kit from TTI for LX/LC platform Hemi cars features 304 stainless 1 7/8- to 2-inch step-tube headers with 3-inch ball collectors and 3-bolt floating flanges to quickly evacuate exhaust. (For ’05-13 Charger, Chrysler 300, and Dodge Magnum, use PN PK-SRT8XP-MA, $2,560.95. For ’08-13 Dodge Challenger, use PN PK-SRT8XP-CH, $2,828.95.) From there it dumps into a 3-inch od 304 stainless header-back system that’s mandrel bent for consistent flow and precise fit. First, people hear the sound, then they see the slick-looking mirror-polished 304 stainless slip-fit exhaust tips filling up the rear fascia cutouts. Sound, horsepower, and style—what else do you need on your SRT8?

a
Photo Gallery: Hot Parts – December 2014

How to Perform Rust Repair
How to Perform Rust Repair
Our 1971 Dodge Challenger R/T was a project abandoned in the ’80s but now we’re tackling it again, first by getting rid of the rust.

Most serious restoration projects start with the body. If you are as lucky as we are, that body is a relatively solid and rust-free example of Mopar’s best. Our 1971 Dodge Challenger R/T is a project abandoned in the late 1980s, after having undergone major disassembly. Part of the body had been stripped to the bare metal all those years ago, resulting in surface rust in the bare metal areas. We showed you how to handle that in the last issue of Mopar Muscle. Oddly, very close scrutiny of our Challenger showed no real rust in any of the usual Mopar places. The lower doors, quarters, fenders, extension panels, trunk, and floorpans were virtually as clean as the day the car rolled off the assembly line. We did have one area showing rust through—a section of the upper quarter just under the roof seam. Here we suspected a torn vinyl top collected moisture leading to the isolated localized rust through. Our job was to fix it.

a
Photo Gallery: How to Perform Rust Repair

Inland Empire Driveline Services – The Spin Zone
Inland Empire Driveline Services - The Spin Zone
At some point, every hot rodder in the land will need a new driveshaft, and 9 out of 10 times it will need to be custom built. It could be because you’ve added an overdrive transmission, or upgraded the rearend, or bent the stock one at the drags…

At some point, every hot rodder in the land will need a new driveshaft, and 9 out of 10 times it will need to be custom built. It could be because you’ve added an overdrive transmission, or upgraded the rearend, or bent the stock one at the drags—the time will come when you will need another one. And while you very well might be tempted to craft your own, you’ll quickly find out what a nightmare that is without the specialized skills and tools that only a dedicated driveshaft shop can bring to bear.

a
Photo Gallery: Inland Empire Driveline Services – The Spin Zone

Performance Clinic – December 2014

Take a look at the Performance Clinic for December 2014, where questions from you guys get answered.Magnum MatchUp a Photo Gallery: Performance Clinic – December

Crate Engines – Crate Loads Of Power!

We know the sound of building an individually tailored engine spec’d out exactly for you and your car sounds appealing, and if you’re a serious racer or have a highly specialized platform, that’s the way to go.We know the sound of building an individua

Performance Clinic – Questions and Answers – November 2014

We answer more of our readers’ tech questions in this month’s Performance Clinic!Carb Concern a Photo Gallery: Performance Clinic – Questions and Answers – November

First Look: Edelbrock Hemi Heads

Edelbrock’s new Victor Jr. Hemi heads are designed for the guy who is building anything from a 426- through 572-inch Hemi. The heads feature fully CNC-machined combustion chambers and CNC-blended valve seat areas to help get optimal airflow.We all know

How to Handle Surface Rust on Your Mopar
How to Handle Surface Rust on Your Mopar
We show you how to handle surface rust on your Mopar without taking it to a shop.

Mopar projects come in all kinds of conditions, and though we’d all like to start with a garage-kept survivor, reality means that most of us are not so lucky. Projects are often cars that have sat in fields, sometimes for decades, or vehicles that have passed from owner to owner in various incomplete stages of “restoration.” Even if the car in question is generally solid, one of the most typical issues to deal with is surface rust. Surface rust of the sheetmetal can begin under a weathered vinyl top, bare metal left exposed from a stillborn project, or just the factory paint giving up after more than 40 years in the elements. Surface rust will usually come with light to moderate pitting of the sheetmetal surface, and this condition can be treated; however, if the rust has advanced to the stages of extreme pitting and pinholes, all bets are off. Replacement becomes the only viable plan.

a
Photo Gallery: How to Handle Surface Rust on Your Mopar

Older Posts →